A 14th Century Ancient Japanese Practice Yields Lumber Without Cutting Down Trees

Japan is an intriguing country (especially for an outsider) that never ceases to amaze and inspire people by striving for perfection. It appears that the pursuit of excellence is something that’s deeply embedded in the culture, and it shows in different areas of life and in various ways.

The Land of the Rising Sun, Japan, is a very captivating country. The quest for perfection has always been there. The roots are from the nation’s culture and it’s quite obvious in different life contexts.

A lot of people are aware of bonsais. Its origins come from the Japanese art of production of small trees. There’s another concept called Daisugi. Although the making of such is very much like that of bonsai, the outcome is different.

The technique started in the 14th century. There’s a Twitter post written by Wrath of Gnon related to this. It had seventeen thousand likes. The upload went viral on other social media platforms such as Imgur and Reddit.

Daisugi, an ancient Japanese forestry technique truly exists.

Image credits: wrathofgnon

Image credits: wrathofgnon

Kitayama people started the technique. They used this to solve the issue of seedling shortages. Flatland is scarce in the area so tree and plant growth was a difficulty. From then on, Daisugi practices became useful for tree specialists since the method made harvesting faster. It also allowed for better production of thicker wood.

Years passed and, unfortunately, the Daisugi method became unpopular. In recent times, one could see these kinds of trees in well-maintained green spaces.

Image credits: wrathofgnon

Image credits: wrathofgnon

Image credits: wrathofgnon

Image credits: wrathofgnon

Image credits: wrathofgnon

Image credits: wrathofgnon

Image credits: wrathofgnon

Image credits: wrathofgnon

Image credits: wrathofgnon

Image credits: wrathofgnon

Image credits: wrathofgnon

Image credits: wrathofgnon

Image credits: 1000yearhouse

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